30
Mar

Applicant Vs Application

b8Applying for a job shouldn’t be so difficult. As owner of an Executive Search Firm, I read and hear complaints every day about the difficulty of the application process. I hear the same complaints about the hiring process but that will be another article. I encourage HR Departments to realize how many valuable human assets they lose through their online application process.

In the world of online applications, it now takes a minimum of 30 to 45 minutes to complete the basic application — not including additional hours spent on assessment and personality tests. In the world of online applications, isn’t it time to ask “how many talented applicants will never be seen by your Hiring Managers because of your application process?” These are positions your Hiring Manager says he desperately needs to fill, right? The problem from my perspective: Most HR Department are too institutionalized and ‘rote’ in their behaviors to accommodate expedited hiring.

This may be a wake-up call for HR Departments! If your company branding is working; i.e., the applicants are finding your job site, why not make it a pleasure doing business with you? Stop wasting the time of your valuable applicants! It negates all of your positive and powerful brand marketing. If the resume (or LinkedIn Profile) isn’t enough for the FIRST STEP, then you should limit any additional required information so that your application can be completed in less than 15 minutes.

After the applications are quickly reviewed for creditable skills/experience for the position, THEN the Hiring Manager should be involved. Only after the Hiring Manager shows interest in pursuing the applicants(s) should the applicants be asked to complete the NEXT STEP of the screening process (assessment/personality testing). There is no logical reason why every single applicant should spend hours filling out applications that will never be seen by a Hiring Manager.

Recent surveys show that 42% of applicants having a negative experience with a company’s application process say that would never work for that company. Doesn’t that make you wonder how many talented applicants have been lost because of excessive and complicated online application processes? The solution really lies somewhere between a ‘digital experience like buying a book on Amazon’ and ‘filling out an online federal tax return’.

Very few companies, and even fewer recruiting software vendors, offer one-step apply capabilities. Instead, most have an extremely complex and convoluted application systems that require dozens of different clicks to do something as simple as submitting a resume to a job posting. This flies in the face of data from surveys that cite a 33% decrease in conversion by having a two-step apply process. Congratulations to the few companies who have simplified their online process and adopted a ‘one-step’ or ‘one click’ approach.

If you don’t know how many clicks your application process takes, then you should find out. Apply for one of your own listings without using any shortcuts. The answer, for most employers, will probably be both shocking and sobering. And, each and every one of those extra clicks is going to cost you great candidates. Many of your applicants often drop out of the process even before you’re able to capture their information. Many HR Reps and Hiring Managers sometimes have the attitude that an onerous application process somehow is an effective screening mechanism, and that “if they were motivated, they’d take the time to finish the application.” News flash: that’s a bunch of hooey!

23
Mar

What Valuable Career Has Yet To Be Established

b7In the career space it is becoming increasingly certain that the future of careers is increasingly uncertain. The headwinds of change are strengthening and what in traditional employment has looked stable is now looking unstable. There are a variety of economic and social shifts ushering in this climate of modification and adjustment, influenced largely by globalization, technology, and changing demographics with the trends looking irreversible. Given that significant change has a way of making people nervous and anxious it could seem that the future may be something to fear. But what if we were to reframe this phenomenon as an opportunity? It can be done.

Viewing undetermined career variations favorably begins with asking the question, “What valuable career(s) has/have yet to be established?” To begin answering the question let’s pass through the portal allowing us to view the world’s many challenges. There is certainly no shortage of problems in need of resolutions. The demands are countless and the need for bold, positive, and progressive actions, leading to widespread beneficial advances is urgent. So where do we begin? Following are my picks for top categories where future talent can best direct their energies-in ways about which we can only today dream.

Poverty: The most egregious plight continuing to poison humankind is the plague of poverty. It burdens us all economically, in terms of security, and of course morally. Must we continue to accept that so many of the planet’s people struggle to live healthy lives of happiness and fulfillment?

Economics: If there is one thing we learned from the recent recession it is that our economic health is far from secure. Expertise in the financial industry and among the monetary decision makers is required to maintain a fiscal model free of the wild and dangerous speculative swings that can so devastate Main Street.

Healthcare: Preventing and treating disease, promoting wellness, and leveraging recent breakthroughs in science and medicine contribute immeasurably to the number of career opportunities. Projections are that Healthcare will see very strong growth. Many lives are just waiting to be enhanced and heightened.

Environment: Managing a growing global population that demands more use of finite resources and higher living standards is our collective reality for the foreseeable future. There will be no shortage of creative solutions to be discovered assisting the planet in supporting the burgeoning masses.

Business Services: Aiding business to provide the necessary and desired goods and services, which will elevate and sustain enjoyable and productive lives remains important. Profitable and rewarding models and techniques are still in need of detection and development.

Lifestyle: Crafting the zeitgeist of new eras will be in the hands and minds of those involved in the arts, fashion, music, literature, and culture as they seek novel ways of expressing the times. Creative facility is waiting to be unleashed to communicate the spirit and meaning of ages yet to come.

I could go on. Energy, International Relations, Social Work, and many other fields hold promise as areas for future career development. Societies yearn for original and fresh approaches to improve and better the world. All of us, young and old, have the capacity to meet this demand.

We owe it to ourselves to nurture and expand an entrepreneurial mindset, leading to innovative problem solving and wealth creation. Let’s train and orient our youth in particular to be entrepreneurial success stories and not merely laborers practicing routine procedures. Discovering concepts new, untried, and effective should be encouraged as much if not more than reproducing commodities. Permit and reassure our students and children to take reasonable risk, collaborate with like-minded entrepreneurs, and apply intelligence in peculiar and offbeat ways.

13
Mar

Best Cities For New College Graduates To Find A Job In 2016

b6Congratulations!

Your name was on the grad list. All your efforts were worth it after all, and now you’re set to achieve greater things!

First, you’ll have to find the right city to ignite your career as a new college graduate, so you can make it to the top as quickly as you can.

But with so many cities and options, where exactly should you start? How would you know the best city to find the right entry-level job and affordable cost of living for new college graduates?

Starting your career in the right city can help you put the right foot forward – so we’ve compiled the best cities for new college graduates to find a job this year.

10 Best Cities for New College Graduates To Find A Job In 2016

1. Pittsburgh, PA

In 2015, the United States Census Bureau estimated that Pittsburgh is home to 304, 391 people. But as a new college graduate, what are your chances of finding the right job in the Steel City?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the United States unemployment rate as of April 2016 was 5.30 percent, while Pittsburgh’s unemployment rate during that same period was 5.4 percent.

So lets dig deeper to see how your career could turn out if you decide to move to Pittsburgh.

The median home price of this city is $111,300, while the cost of living is 10% lower than the national average.

Also, the average commute time in Pittsburgh is 25.95 minutes. While 54 percent of commuters in Pittsburgh drive inside their car all alone, about 10 percent carpool with others, 19 percent use mass transit and 3 percent work from home.

As a new college graduate, chances are, you’ll consider renting a home when you move to Pittsburgh.

2. Cincinnati, OH

Cincinnati is one of the best cities for new college graduates looking to find a job this year. In July 2015, the United States Census Bureau estimated that Cincinnati is home to 298,550 people.

Compared to other cities in the United States, Cincinnati’s cost of living is 16.60% lower than the national average. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Cincinnati’s unemployment rate as of April 2016 was 4.2 percent while the national average was 5.30. The good news is job availability is rising and recently at a rate of 2.29 percent.

But how fast can you make it to your office if you find a job in Cincinnati? The average commute time of this city is 22 minutes, 3 minutes faster than the national average of 25 minutes. If you own a car, you can join the 71 percent of commuters who drive in their car alone. Up to 8 percent of commuters take mass transit, 10 percent carpool with others, while 4 percent work from home.

3. Kansas City, MO

Starting out in the right city can give you an edge in your career.

There is more to Kansas City than its world champion baseball team and its barbecues, though they are really tasty. As of July 2015, Kansas City’s population was estimated at 475,378 says the United States Census Bureau.

The median home cost of this city is $132,300, while the unemployment rate was 3.9 as of April, 2016 according to Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The cost of living in Kansas City is 5.90% lower than the United States average which is 6.30. So how soon can you make it to your office if you’re hired in Kansas City?

The average commute time in this city is 21.32 minutes, few minutes lower than the national average of 25 minutes. 81 percent of commuters in this city drive their own car alone, 9 percent carpool with others, 4 percent use mass transit, while 4 percent work from home.

4. Indianapolis, IN

Indianapolis is home to 831,230 people making it the largest city in Indiana according to the United States Census Bureau. The median home price in this city is $120, 500, while the cost of living is 11.10% lower than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in Indianapolis was 4.7 percent as of April 2016, which was lower than the national average of 5.30.

So how fast can you get to work in Indianapolis? The average commute time in this city is 22.7 minutes, lower than the United States average of 25 minutes. In this city, 82 percent of commuters drive in their car alone, 10 percent commute in the same car with others, 2 percent use public transportation, while 3 percent work from home.

Since you’re a new college graduate, chances are you’ll consider renting a home or an apartment for a start.

5. Nashville, TN

According to the United States Census Bureau, the population of Nashville, Tennessee as of July 2015 was 654,610. The median home value in Nashville is $188,400. The cost of living in Nashville is 0.80% lower than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in Nashville was is 3.1 percent as of April 2016, while the United States average was 5.30 percent.

The average commute time in this city is 23.09 minutes. In that time, 80 percent of commuters drive their own car, 11 percent commute with others in their car, 2 percent take mass transit, while 5 percent work from home.

6. Columbus, OH

The population of Columbus City was 850,106 as of July 2015 according to the United States Census Bureau. The median home price in Columbus is $95,900. The cost of living in Columbus is 17.90% lower than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in this city is 3.9 percent and its lower than the U.S. average of 5.30 percent according to the United States Census Bureau. The good news is Columbus City’s job growth have been positive in recent years and as a new college graduate, your chances of finding entry level jobs are high here.

In Columbus City, the average commute time is 21 minutes, 3 percent work from home, 81 percent of commuters drive in their car alone, about 9 percent carpool with others while 3 percent take mass transit.

What about housing? Odds are you’ll have to rent a home or an apartment when you get your first job in Columbus City.

7. Minneapolis – St. Paul, MN

The population of Minneapolis according to the United States Census Bureau is 410,939. The median home value in this city is $190,900. The cost of living in Minneapolis is 8% higher than the national average compared to the other parts of the country.

The unemployment rate in this city was 3.40 percent as of April 2016, while the national average was 5.30 percent according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The average commute time in this city is 22.19 minutes. 14 percent of commuters in Minneapolis take mass transit, 62 percent of commuters drive their cars alone, 5 percent work from home, while 9 percent carpool with others.

8. Philadelphia, PA

According to the United States Census Bureau, Philadelphia is home to 1,567,442 people, making it one of the top ten largest metropolitan areas in the United States. Philadelphia’s medium home cost is $103,400. The cost of living in this city is 3.80 percent lower than the United States average.

Considering its large population, Philadelphia’s unemployment rate is 6.6 percent as of April 2016, while the United Sates average at the same period was 5.30 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The average commute time in Philadelphia is 32 minutes, 26 percent of commuters take mass transit, 50 percent of commuters drive their own car, 9 percent carpool with others, while 3 percent work from home.

9. Chicago, I

How many people live in Chicago? According to the United States Census Bureau, the population of people living in Chicago as of July 2015 was 2,720, 546. Chicago’s median home price is $165,700.

The cost of living in Chicago is 3.40 higher than the United States average.

The unemployment rate of this city is 4.7 percent as of May 2016 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The average commute time in Chicago is 33.49 minutes, 27 percent of commuters take mass transit, 50 percent drive in their own car alone, 10 percent carpool with others, while 4 percent work from home.

10. San Francisco, CA

In July 2015, the United States Census Bureau estimated that 864,816 people call San Francisco home. The city’s median home cost is $875, 100. Although, San Francisco’s cost of living is 142.60 percent higher than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in this city is 3.7 percent as at April 2016. The average commute time of this city is 29.93 minutes – 32 percent of commuters in this city take mass transit, 37 percent drive their own car alone, 8 percent carpool with others, while 7 percent work from home.

9
Mar

How To Become A Physical Therapist

b5Physical therapy is a continually growing field and in my opinion is one of the best jobs to have if you enjoy problem solving, helping people and workdays that never see the same thing twice. Forbes has ranked physical therapy as “one of the ten happiest jobs” and as “one of the top ten jobs in high demand” for several years. The biggest perk of being a physical therapist is the ability to help people feel and move better, by relieving pain, rehabilitating injuries, and improving quality of life. Physical therapists’ vast knowledge of the muscles and joints of the human body and extensive understanding of body mechanics helps to decrease our own risk of injuries during sports and daily activities. The nature of our job also allows us to avoid being sedentary throughout the day and assists in our ability to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

So now that the benefits of being a physical therapist have been established, how do you go about attaining such a rewarding job? What does it take to become a physical therapist?

Ninety-five percent of the accredited physical therapy programs in the United States are doctorate level programs. This means that you must complete your undergraduate degree before being accepted into a physical therapy program. Most accredited programs require prerequisite courses including anatomy, physiology, biology, chemistry, physics, and psychology with an undergraduate G.P.A. of at least 3.0. If you have completed your prerequisites in undergrad, you can apply to programs before you graduate. If you have not completed the prerequisites and have already received your undergraduate degree, you can still take the needed classes at a community college or any other accredited university and apply once all the prerequisites have been completed. Applicants are also required to submit acceptable scores on the GRE and provide several letters of recommendation. Most programs also require 100-200 hours of physical therapy experience, whether it’s volunteering at a hospital and observing a physical therapist or working as an aide at an outpatient clinic.

Once an applicant is accepted into physical therapy school, the hard work continues for another three years. The average curriculum includes advanced courses such as anatomy, neuropathology, differential diagnosis, biomechanics, pharmacology, cardiopulmonary conditions, modalities, radiology, and therapeutic exercise. A large part of the curriculum is also focused on hands on lab time practicing manual or hands-on skills including soft tissue mobilization, joint mobilization, and manual stretching/neuromuscular facilitation. All graduate level physical therapy programs also require students to have clinical experience. Students complete several internships in a variety of settings-outpatient orthopedic, inpatient acute hospital care, sub-acute rehab, and pediatric.

After a busy three years of grad school and finally graduating with a doctorate of physical therapy, it’s time for the next step – taking the board exam. In order to attain a physical therapy license, which is required to practice as a physical therapist in the United States, it is necessary to pass the National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE). The NPTE is an extensive exam that covers patient evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for all aspects of physical therapy practice. Additionally, in the state of California (and 28 other states), a jurisprudence exam is also required. The jurisprudence exam tests the state’s laws and regulations for practicing physical therapy.